Counselling and Supervision

Following Government advise, we are no longer able to provide face to face counselling and supervision. We are in the process of training our team in online/phone counselling and then offering this to our existing clients. We are also working on how initial consultations may be able to be completed remotely, but until we are confident in providing this at the required standard, we will not be taking any new referrals. We apologise for the inconvenience and thank you for your patience.

The following websites provide lists of counsellors who are able to provide online/phone counselling now:

Association of Christian Counsellors
Counselling Directory
British Association of Counselling & Psychotherapy

Workshops and Training

Unfortunately we have had to postpone the workshops we had planned for the next few months, however places can still be booked and we will announce new dates as soon as possible. Our Diploma course has moved online, thanks to Zoom and Google Classroom 🙂

Helplines and Advice

SO:Linked is the main source of information for the public and frontline staff on services and support available in Southampton to help people at this time.

Southampton City Council provides help and guidance, including where to get support if you are struggling.

If you are waiting for counselling or just looking for some help, then the following are a great source of self-help strategies. Please be aware that these apps cannot be an effective replacement for standard therapies. Remember to choose them wisely and use them mindfully* 

Calm Harm is an app designed to help people resist or manage the urge to self- harm. It’s private and password protected, and is based on the principles of dialectical behaviour therapy (DBT). DBT is a type of talking therapy that’s often effective in people with mood disorders. The app provides tasks that encourage users to distract themselves from urges to self-harm and help manage their “emotional mind” in a more positive way.

Big White Wall is an online community for people who are stressed, anxious or feeling low. The service has an active forum with round-the-clock support from trained professionals. You can talk anonymously to other members and take part in group or one-to-one therapy with therapists.

Breethe’s guided meditations series, inspirational talks, and master classes from mindfulness coach Lynne Goldberg can help better navigate life’s challenges and enjoy improved peace of mind. The app’s sleep music playlists, nature sounds, and bedtime readings help towards a more restful sleep.

For Me (Childline) was created by four teenagers who realised there was an urgent need for young people to have easy access to confidential advice and support. When Childline first launched over 30 years ago all contact was over the phone, with many calls being made from telephone boxes. This app is now available as a free download so young people can easily access Childline’s online services. These include: 1-2-1 chat with a counsellor / ‘Ask Sam’ problem pages / Private Locker – a personal area where young people can track their mood and write down their thoughts.

The Clear Fear app powered by stem4 provides ways for children and young people to manage symptoms of anxiety. Developed by a Consultant Clinical Psychologist, together with ideas from young people, Clear Fear uses CBT to help change anxious thoughts and emotions, alter anxious behaviours and calm fear responses. The app also has helpful descriptions of the different ways in which anxiety shows, resources and a ‘grit box’ to boost resilience. The app can also be personalised and there is the ability to track progress and notice change.

The Headspace  app is a great choice to learn the essentials of meditation and mindfulness, with a free 10-part “basics” course and whimsical animations. The sessions, which come in three, five or 10-minute chunks, are easy to follow, focusing on breathing and scanning through the body to check in on how one feels.

Kooth offers online emotional and mental health support for children and young people aged between 11 – 24 years in the South East, and is available up to 10pm every day. It is free, anonymous and completely confidential.

Abuse Helplines:

* CCTS Disclaimer: These links are being provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only; they do not constitute an endorsement or an approval by CCTS of any of the products, services or opinions of the organisation or individual. CCTS bears no responsibility for the accuracy, legality or content of the external site or for that of subsequent links. Contact the external site for answers to questions regarding its content.